Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

Is Evolution To Blame For Our Denial?

A recent Newsweek article (March 29, 2010), Their Own Worst Enemies proposes that there is something “peculiarly American about the rejection of science.”  The article tells us what we probably already know: Americans seem to embrace or “believe in” scientific ideas less than other developed countries. In particular, a recent Gallup poll found that we are 33rd out of 34 countries in the percentage of our people who accept that species have evolved.

The title of the article references the scientists who are “lousy communicators.” They bring the message of the truth and expect that it will be absorbed, but take little responsibility for its acceptance. Lets say this really was a problem – as if finding fossils and genes, etc. were not enough of a job. Do European and Japanese scientists take courses in marketing and communication? Why are we so resistant?

I have lived in this country all of my life. I have lived in Amish country, Chocolate Country, Citrus Country, Mountain Country and Tree-Hugging Country. So perhaps I should be more desensitized to the lack of interest and education about the most basic workings of our universe. But I continue to be dumbfounded when people cling to the rejection of concepts proven by objective science.

I don’t think that all these people flat out reject the science either. The reality is even worse than this. A fair number of people just do not care. They do not look for the information and when faced with what could be illuminating discoveries and analysis, their eyes glaze over.

Since I really need an explanation – a scientific explanation – for the mass denial in my country, I suggest that its just evolution.

Yes, that would be perfect symmetry!

We are a young country. As Newsweek points out, the first White Americans came from ancestors trying to buck the system only a couple hundred years ago. They didn’t take well to those in charge in England and maybe shrugging off scientific authority is part of our makeup.  Of course, not all of us are descendants of those who came off the first boats. Many of us came from much later “boats” and shouldn’t be beholden to any reasoning that blames our current ignorance on the old White people in wigs with accents.  

However, as I play out this theory for argument’s sake, the people with authority who have ruled our institutions and built our media, are generally made from the same bones as those who were bold and arrogant enough to leave the royal hierarchy in search of  “religious freedom,” only to kill off the natives because they didn’t fit with their own ideas of what was “right” and “civilized.”  These same descendants (though not exclusively)  tend to be arrogant enough to claim expert on topics through the Bible.  It is put forth in the same Newsweek article that our current lack of enlightenment is a symptom of the Reformation – the idea that everyone can have direct access to the Divine. Everyone can know The Truth through the Bible (or google and Wikipedia) – why bother with complicated topics like archeology, biology and chemistry?

Perhaps the current state of our public interest and education around science, not to mention outright obtuse denial, is just part of societal evolution, if not genetic mutation.  In terms of our species a few hundred years barely allows for hair color to change in a family. We have time to redeem ourselves if our genetic stock has left us disadvantaged.

Maybe, given a few hundred more years we will be open to new discoveries by people who are smarter than us. My guess is that we will also legalize pot and Gay marriage, while banning guns, after we’ve had a little more time to evolve.

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Flailing About – Atheist Parenthood in A Time of God and War

As I am driving my kids to school today my 6yr old asks me the simple question about whether airplanes have guns. Of course, I leave nothing unexplained in my household and it never ceases to get me in trouble. This simple question leads to war planes, which may seem fair, then to Iraq and Afghanistan.  

Then my older daughter gets afraid that war could happen in the US.  She wants to confirm that war can’t happen here because “California is the best place”. Not wanting to promote blind  nationalism (or state-ism), I don’t feel ok letting this go. I get myself in deeper as I explain that “we are such a strong country and people don’t usually mess with us on our own turf”. The topics are  getting very jumbled up here and I am swerving in and out of traffic aware that I am confusing their minds even more and still feeling like I have an important opportunity to make an impression here. Of what, I don’t know.

And as I am giving a Kindergarten explanation of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan I find myself spouting rationale that is way to conservative (think how Bush used to explain things, as if to a two year old…) and my sensibilities won’t allow me to leave them with this either. So I get into the whole Twin Tower disaster and try to explain what happened afterwards which led us into a war that Mama and Daddy didn’t agree with. I mentioned Muslim extremists here and of course their eyes really glazed over.

So, my sweet 7 yr old asks why anyone has to go to war. With my limited capacity to recall  history I think of a few recent examples. l tell them that with so many people believing in god in so many different ways, people often get upset and even go to war. I use the examples of Christians, Muslims and Jews, who all believe in the same god differently.

A lightbulb turns on for me and I seize on the point that I am going to try to salvage out of the past 25 minutes. I point out, “Isn’t it silly to go to war over god, something that isn’t even real?”  Such a good point but apparently a miss. The next thing I know they are saying so and so “doesn’t look Muslim, they are nice” and “I know a boy who believes in god, but no way is he a Christian!” 

Ah geez, now we are running late for the bell, climbing out of the car with our multitude of bags, jackets and lunches, and I have my kid thinking that a girl  in her class is a bad person because she wears a head scarf. So, I kiss them on the cheek and I try to sum it all up:

Just remember that lots of people believe in god – most of them are nice, even if they are wrong.  I point out a few of their favorite people who happen to be Muslim or Christian and watch as their eyes turn into saucers. No Way!! The bell rings and I send them on their way.

 Now, I am reminded that well-intentioned people always make things worse with their big mouths (think Harry Reid).  I have some back pedaling to do over dinner tonight. Next time perhaps I will take a page from my husband’s approach around topics like family dysfunction and pedophiles and just say, you don’t need to know about this yet…But probably not.

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Atheists Don’t Hate Like This

A friend recently made me aware of a potential type of “genocide” brewing in Uganda. I thought, “well it is Uganda and haven’t they been embroiled in all sorts of conflict over the years?” 

 However, this is a new twist involving human rights, and it appears that this death march for gays was instigated by Christians. I am not bashing an entire group here.  Many Christians are good people and have already spoken out against this policy abroad.

Instead of being negative about Christians, I am attempting to point out something positive about non-believers. I am simply saying that such deafening hate and murder rarely comes from us Atheists (at least not as a movement), who are often marred with a reputation for being amoral. While of course, I won’t claim we are the victims here. I offer this as an example that there needs to be  more acknowledgement that Atheists are often the opposite of hate in these types of religiously-based, fear mongering scenarios, as we have no reason to assign morality to personal characteristics. 

Ok, enough rant. I promised an approach to making Atheism positive here.

**If you would like to condemn these outrageous violations contact your legislatures and tell them that we have an obligation to stand up for human rights before the killing continues and people are imprisoned from such hate.  If you need to find your congressperson click here: Contact Your Senators

Contacting your congressperson is not a futile act since congress doesn’t take up any issue until voices become numerous enough. Take Chuck Grassley (R-IA) for instance. He first said he was “to busy” to deal with the issue, but later capitulated after he heard from enough Americans. See this  Think Progress Article for an explanation of why Chuck Grassley is a salient figure here. 

If you would like to know more about the evolution of this check out this video:

Top 10 Ways to Be Visible

I am starting a list of the top ways that everyday Atheists can become visible and promote positive inclusion for non-believers. Ways that each of us can help to de-stigmatize Atheism and non-belief, promote inclusion in politics, public policy and general dialogue. I welcome your ideas, stories and anecdotes. Do we shout from the rooftops, wear quiet signs, make news, become activists???

I’ll get us started and add more as I hear from others:

Top Ten Ways to Promote Visibility and Inclusion of Atheists and Non-Believers

1) Teach your children about non-belief and provide them with language to understand the family values and how they are different or similar from the major religions around us

2) Write your congressmen/women as an Atheist. Find ways to relate your topic of concern (i.e healthcare, education, Darfur, etc) to the values that you hold and how it reflects on your personal Atheism 

3) Wear a sign. I jest, but not really. As an Atheist I am encouraged by signs of community – Darwin Fish, Atheist Unicorn, bumper stickers, etc. and am more inclined to be visible myself when these signs of “safety” abound. Others have suggested small jewelry that sparks conversation (One person commented that they wear a small ‘A’ on a chain.

4) Have Parties on Sunday Mornings.  Maybe subversive, but I love when others have birthday parties or gatherings on Sunday mornings. You are sending a message that part of the weekend is not off limits due to religious services.

5) Say the word “Atheist” a LOT. “Atheist, Atheist Atheist!”It is not a dirty word and the more others are used to hearing it enter the space between two people, the more they will understand, if not embrace the term. We all know those non-believers who defensively step-in with “well, I don’t believe in god, but I’m not an Atheist”. What an opportunity!

Making Atheism Visible

The dialogue around Atheism hasn’t quite tapped into what goes on in my life experience. I am an Atheist. A deconverted Atheist, meaning I once lived a very religious life, with beliefs and convictions that matched.  I am a fan of living the “examined life” and like many Atheists I am pretty convinced that I have managed to navigate a minefield of institutionalized superstition that has most people completely duped.  However, now that I am living the life of an Everyday Atheist I find that I want to make my Atheism something positive. I want to raise my children as happy Atheists who’s thoughtful approach to life brings them true happiness and success.

Much of the discourse on Atheism seems to take a couple different tones: 1) Self-righteous and vindicated in the fact that we know the facts and that others are trapped in fairyland or 2) Quiet and capitulating to the more powerful majority. I don’t think either of these approaches is helpful to the Atheist cause (if there is one).

The self-righteous, often caustic approach is great when your preaching to the choir. I enjoy a good humorous jab at religion and pointing out the ludicrousy of it all. I enjoy being in company where the Atheist dialogue makes me roll with the laughter that only those in the “club” could appreciate. And I am the first to admit that I love living in the San Francisco Bay Area because I love the thinking, liberal bubble I can operate within.  

However, if I am looking for new thoughts or hope to make a decent argument to believers, this approach loses its utility. I am looking for a new dialogue about the experience of being Atheist, not just about the validity of Atheism.  I am looking for visibility, recognition, public office (not for me but for the like-minded), a place of inclusion for my children, and to encourage others to think before they follow like cattle.  

And I looking to help change the second tone of the Atheist dialogue, because the quiet, change -the-conversation, pretend-its-not-important approach to NOT talking about Atheism has got to go down into the distant past, fast. 

So, I begin this blog with the minimum goal of articulating my experience as an Atheist, through all the many complexities as it relates to society, the world, politics, economy, family, etc. But really I write with the not-so-humble goal of destimigtizing thoughtful nonbelievers and making us more visible in politics, family, society, community and the world.